Middle East Articles

Professor Bahri Yilmaz is the owner of the Jean Monnet Chair at Sabancı University in Istanbul. He was a visiting fellow at Pembroke College, Cambridge and at the Center for European Studies  Harvard University. In addition to his academic experience, he has worked as the Chief Advisor to the Ministry of State for European Union Affairs in Ankara (1997-2002). His main fields of research and teaching interest focuses on European Union, International Political Economy, the newly emerging markets, and globalization.


By Bahri Yilmaz  |  January 6, 2011

Constantine Arvanitopoulos is the Professor of International Relations at Panteion University, Athens, Greece. His research interests lie with International Relations theory, specifically the study of regime change, European Politics and US Foreign Policy Analysis. He has taught courses on theory and methodology of International Relations, European Politics, and Comparative Politics. 

By Constantine Arvanitopoulos, Dimitris Keridis  |  January 6, 2011

Raphaël Liogier is the director of the Observatoire du religieux (www.world-religion-watch.org) and a University Professor in Sociology and Theory of Knowledge at the Institute for Political Studies of Aix-en-Provence in France (Science Po Aix). His last book, Souci de Soi, Conscience du Monde : Self Care, World Awareness, deals with the different aspects of the current individualization and globalization of beliefs.

By Raphaël Liogier  |  January 6, 2011

 The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, which already produces 24 million cubic meters of water per day from desalination, about half the world’s total, is building the largest solar-powered water desalination plant in the world in the city of Al-Khafji on the shores of the Persian Gulf. The recent initiative in Saudi Arabia to enlarge its water desalination capacity using high-tech green technology is a smart move, multi-dimensionally strategic and future-oriented. 

By Erika Lee  |  December 23, 2010

 The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, which already produces 24 million cubic meters of water per day from desalination, about half the world’s total, is building the largest solar-powered water desalination plant in the world in the city of Al-Khafji on the shores of the Persian Gulf. The recent initiative in Saudi Arabia to enlarge its water desalination capacity using high-tech green technology is a smart move, multi-dimensionally strategic and future-oriented. 

By Erika Lee  |  December 23, 2010

The misconception that Muslim countries reflect the true face of Islam and its teachings is fundamental to the growing chasm between Muslims and non-Muslims, fueling suspicion and fear, and in turn dividing societies and countries.

By Hossein Askari  |  December 14, 2010

Emma Williams is a British physician and journalist WHO has written extensively about the second intifada in the early 2000s. She has recently published a memoir on the subject, It's Easier to Reach Heaven than the End of the Street (Olive Branch Press, 2010).

By Emma Williams  |  September 28, 2010

Unanimity rarely occurs in legislatures worldwide—even rarer, then, would it be to have two simultaneous unanimous votes. The 18th amendment to Pakistan’s constitution thus carries the unusual distinction of being approved by all 292 members of the Pakistani National Assembly and all 90 senators of the Senate, on April 8 and 16 respectively, before President Asif Ali Zardari signed it into law on April 19. However, the total agreement in voting is merely an interesting aside.

By Catherine Yang  |  August 1, 2010

An increasingly common approach to governing religion and state relations in non-secular settings is a mixed system of religious law and general legal principles. Despite their many past and present variations, such hybrid legal regimes defy the Franco-American ideal of separating religion and state along private/public lines. At least one billion people now live under a legal order that enshrines religion and its interlocutors as “a” or “the” source of legislation (meaning that legislation must comply with principles of that religion), granting religious tribunals jurisdiction over important aspects of life, public and private, in addition to the tremendous symbolic weight religious edicts often carry.

By Ran Hirschl  |  August 1, 2010

Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s recent visit to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia culminated in the March 2010 signing of the Riyadh Declaration, through which he and Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud agreed to a far-reaching expansion of bilateral relations. Building on the Delhi Declaration of 2006, Singh’s visit resulted in agreements promising increased security cooperation, joint research and development initiatives, and reciprocal extradition policies.

By Aaron Mattis  |  May 1, 2010