Americas Articles

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David Bacon’s Children of NAFTA: Labor Wars on the US/Mexican Border offers a wide view of labor issues on both sides of the US-Mexican border and a deep view of the plight of involved unions and individuals. It is likely to appeal to multiple audiences, including policymakers, academics, union leaders, and the general public.

By Scott Morgenstern  |  May 6, 2006
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I would like to complement James Hsiung's article ("The Strategic Triangle," Spring 2004) by exploring the "not-so-strategic" triangle and thinking about the future of the relations between the three key players. In juxtaposing my themes with those of Hsiung's, the triangular relationship may perhaps be further understood in the current and future political context.

By Yu Bin  |  May 6, 2006
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Since Vincente Fox was elected president of Mexico in July 2000, the Zapatista rebellion in the Mexican state of Chiapas has received little attention from the international media. The tension between the government and the rebels, however, continues to affect regional stability today.

By Antonio Lupher  |  May 6, 2006
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Between 1968 and 1971, I repeatedly broke a solemn, formal promise that I had made in good faith: not to reveal to any "unauthorized persons" information that I received through certain channels and under certain safeguards, collectively known as the "classification" system.

By Daniel Ellsberg  |  May 6, 2006
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In the summer of 1998, representatives from 160 countries and a host of non-governmental organizations converged in Rome to draft a mandate for the establishment of the world's first global court for the prosecution of war crimes, genocide, and crimes against humanity. One month later, the Rome Statute emerged, creating the International Criminal Court (ICC). The theoretical foundation of the Rome Statute was the principle of jus cogens, the idea that peremptory moral norms bind all human beings regardless of national identity.

By Nick Green  |  May 6, 2006
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Alongside the proliferation of international treaties over the past half-century, an ongoing debate has grown in the United States over whether US courts should operate as part of an international system of law or remain an isolated entity. In a landmark ruling on June 29, 2004, the US Supreme Court upheld that US federal courts are open to hear complaints over violations of international law, thus allowing foreign victims of serious human rights abuses to sue individuals or companies in US courts.

By Genevieve Sheehan  |  May 6, 2006
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The experiences of Bolivia and Ecuador over the past few years highlight the strength of indigenous movements in Latin America today and the momentum such movements have gained since their rebirth in the 1980s. Long relegated either to the peasant class or to the amorphous conglomeration of human beings Latin Americans refer to as the “marginal,” indigenous populations remain among the least integrated, most exploited groups in the region. However, social movements sparked by this community are beginning to hold their own ground.

By Gabriel Loperena  |  May 6, 2006
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In the summer of 2004, the US National Committee on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (“the 9/11 Commission”) released its final report explaining why the United States was blindsided by Al Qaeda on September 11, 2001, and what improvements the United States could make to reduce the chances of another catastrophic terrorist attack on US soil. The Commission went to great lengths to identify the shortcomings of the US governmental system that allowed the attacks to occur. Despite the Commission’s efforts, one important topic remained outside the scope of their report: the intellectual mindset that guides US national security strategy.

By Louis Klarevas  |  May 6, 2006
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Both state-led and market-led approaches to development present substantial difficulties in implementation and costs. However, for a country striving for economic development and a better position in the international economy in the long run, the state-led approach seems more advisable.

By Jeanette Park  |  May 6, 2006
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The discovery of new non-renewable natural resources, such as oil, natural gas, and minerals, has often been viewed as a sure-fire foundation for national development. Those countries lucky enough to strike black gold, or gold itself, see themselves as having taken the first important step on the road to prosperity. Therefore, it is not surprising that many have placed their hopes in resource exploitation as the means for lifting out of poverty a large proportion of the 2.7 billion people (nearly half of the world’s population) who live on less than US$2 per day.

By Melissa Dell  |  May 6, 2006